The Best Free Resources For Learning German

Looking for the best free German resources to use in between your Lingoci lessons? This is the page for you.

TV, News & Radio

Online Dictionaries

Flashcards

Other Tools

TV, News & Radio

DW (Deutsche Welle) – The website of Germany’s public international broadcaster has a lot to offer. On the site you can:

Watch live TV  (note, you may need to activate Flash in your browser)
Find video and audio content filtered by topic
Listen to podcasts
See the latest news stories

ZDF – One of the most popular TV channels in Germany. Here you can watch a lot of their programs even if you are not based in Germany.

Arte – A channel that is renowned for the quality of its programmes. Many of these are available outside Germany. One of our favourites is Xenius, an intriguing documentary series exploring all sorts of interesting questions.

Online Dictionaries

Keep an online dictionary open during lessons to support your learning. Here are some of the best:

Reverso – A super dictionary by the publisher, Collins. Examples show each word in context within sentences. In addition, you can see additional translations for colloquial words and expressions that have been added by users. It also has a good verb conjugator.

WordReference – Like Reverso, WordReference is constantly growing through user input. If the dictionary doesn’t show the translation you’re looking for, you can check the forum results at the bottom of the page.

Forvo – A dictionary for learning pronunciation. At the time of writing it has recordings of over 500,000 German words pronounced by native speakers!

Finally, we recommend enabling Google Translate in your browser or downloading the extension if necessary so that you can very quickly translate German sentences. Just be aware that it does not understand context so well, so the translations are not always 100% accurate.

Flashcards

Struggling to remember all the new words that you’re coming across? Flashcards are possibly the most effective way to memorise language. They use a concept called spaced repetition – an algorithm recognises how well you know each word/flashcard, then prioritises them so that you study the things you don’t know, without wasting precious time on the things you already do. You can create flashcards using the new vocabulary you’ve come across during your Lingoci lessons.

Anki Web – The original flashcard system. It’s free, open-source software. The only downside is the interface is slightly complex.

Anki App – An app available on all devices.

Quizlet – Allows you to create your own flashcards online. Download the mobile app and you can learn during your commutes to work. You can easily access all the German flashcards created by other users via this link.

Other Tools

Slow German – A free podcast series by Larissa Vassilian, a journalist from Munich. Unless you have an advanced level of German, it can be difficult to understand German spoken at full speed. Larissa speaks slowly, making her podcast an ideal resource for A2-B2 level students. If you click ‘more’, you can read the transcripts and check words you don’t understand. The topics cover German culture, society and history.

DW Learn German – Lots of free learning materials from Germany’s public broadcaster, including videos, transcripts and exercises for all levels. For levels B1-B2, we recommend ‘Jojo’, a video series following a Brazilian lady as she moves to Germany and tries to ‘find happiness’.

Lingolia – Provides clear explanations and exercises for improving your grammar and building your vocabulary. You can switch the explanations between German and English in the top right.